Animals Searching for ‘Furever’ Homes

Adopting an animal can seem like a fairly complex process compared to buying one from a breeder. However, adoption is nowhere near as complicated as some may think.

“Our adoption process is pretty simple,” Krissi Hawke, shelter coordinator of the Humane Society Serving Clark County, said. “If it is a good match for the family, the animal can go home the same day.”

Wittenberg’s own Rick Incorvati, an English professor, adopted his dog Bailey, a pit bull mix, from the Humane Society.

“The process was smooth,” Incorvati stated. “Krissi ushered us back first to the puppy area, and then to the mature dogs. We chose one of the puppies, and the process of taking her home was easy: we signed some papers, wrote a check to the Humane Society and put the new family member in a carrying crate.”

After filling out a contract outlining the parameters for adopting their chosen pet, adopters are informed of the Humane Society’s “adoption checklist.”

This checklist states that adopters must take their animal to the vet within five days of adoption. The Humane Society even offers a free wellness exam to any vet within Clark County.

Then, adopters are informed of all the various shots their animals may possibly need. Younger animals may require more shots than older animals.

“The contract has many points to it, but mainly that the animal must always be cared for, licensed and if the adopter cannot keep the animal, they must return it to us,” Hawke stated.

The adopters can also choose to register for 30 days of health insurance for their pet following the adoption. Adopters can also choose to microchip their animal at this time.

If the adopter decides within the next 14 days that their animal isn’t the perfect match for them, they can return it to the Humane Society and receive a refund fee. Other bills, however, like the vet’s bill, cannot be reimbursed.

“Once the adoption is complete, paperwork signed, insurance set up and microchip registered, we take a picture for Facebook and remind the adopter to keep us posted,” Hawke said.

Kathy Voytko, secretary of the education department, has been involved with the Humane Society for the past year.

When she learned of retiree health insurance cuts, she decided to make a Plan B and work to live instead of live to work.

“My daughter had volunteered at PetSmart, and due to her Saturday schedule, she could not continue,” Voytko stated. “I decided to fill in a couple of times, but was told by Mrs. Hawke that I needed to come to the shelter to complete training first. That was when I fell in love with the shelter, the people who work there and the pets.”

When she volunteers at the shelter, Voytko helps hold dogs who need vaccinations, takes pictures for the shelter’s Facebook page and even helps potential adopters find the animal suited best for them.

“Some don’t believe it, but you can see a change in the dog when the right person comes along,” Voytko said.

Voytko, like Incorvati, has adopted a few animals. Not only has she adopted one puppy, she’s adopted two. She’s even adopted two cats as well.

To those looking to adopt, Voytko has some very strong words of advice: “You don’t need to go looking for a designer dog. You can find a variety of pets up for adoption at the shelter and via various rescues in the area.”

The Humane Society has a number of events coming up, including one in Snyder Park towards the end of May.

As always, the shelter is in need of donations. A list of needed donation items can be found on the Humane Society’s website.

“Thanks to the use of Facebook and Krissi’s ability to post on a regular basis . . . they go up for adoption [quickly],” Voytko said. “There have been times where they are posted and adopted within the hour. Others stay a bit longer.”

There are always plenty of animals available for adoption at the Humane Society. For up to date postings of animals in the shelter, check out the shelter’s Facebook page. The shelter is open 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. every Monday through Saturday for potential adopters to take a look at all the animals.

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